STAR|STUFF

A small contribution to the timeless exploration of self.

My meaning simply is, that whatever I have tried to do in life, I have tried with all my heart to do well; that whatever I have devoted myself to, I have devoted myself to completely; that in great aims and in small, I have always been thoroughly in earnest.

Charles Dickens, David Copperfield (via bookmania)

Concern for others gives you courage. When you are solely concerned with ‘I,’ this naturally leads to fear and anxiety, resulting in even more insecurity, making the body imbalanced and riddled with health problems. However, deep within altruism lies courage, which diminishes fear and bestows relaxation, which in turn has beneficial effects on blood pressure and overall well-being.

—The Dalai Lama (via lazyyogi)

(Source: lazyyogi)

Indiana Woods | SusannaLenore | July 2013

museumuesum:

Richard Serra
Balanced, 1970
Hot-rolled steel, 97 x 62 x 1 inches

museumuesum:

Richard Serra

Balanced, 1970

Hot-rolled steel, 97 x 62 x 1 inches

Perfection | SusannaLenore | June 2013

Perfection | SusannaLenore | June 2013

kateoplis:

Olafur Eiasson’s installation at MoMA, Your Waste of Time, consist of broken chunks of Iceland’s Vatnajökull, Europe’s largest glacier. The museum had to turn one of their main galleries into a walk-in freezer to able to display them. “According to PS1, the pieces of ice chosen for the project are about 800 years old. That sounds about right to Ted Scambos, lead scientist at the National Snow and Ice Data Center. Scambos speculates that the ice came from the ‘Little Ice Age,’ the period between the 16th and 19th centuries during which glaciers grew larger than they ever have since—and advanced quickly.
‘These glaciers bear testimony to our history-being suspended and frozen for thousands of years-and now they are melting away, as if our whole history is fading,’ said Eliasson.”

kateoplis:

Olafur Eiasson’s installation at MoMA, Your Waste of Time, consist of broken chunks of Iceland’s Vatnajökull, Europe’s largest glacier. The museum had to turn one of their main galleries into a walk-in freezer to able to display them. “According to PS1, the pieces of ice chosen for the project are about 800 years old. That sounds about right to Ted Scambos, lead scientist at the National Snow and Ice Data Center. Scambos speculates that the ice came from the ‘Little Ice Age,’ the period between the 16th and 19th centuries during which glaciers grew larger than they ever have since—and advanced quickly.

‘These glaciers bear testimony to our history-being suspended and frozen for thousands of years-and now they are melting away, as if our whole history is fading,’ said Eliasson.”

millionsmillions:

The book club has turned into a form of protest. Inspired by “The Standing Man,” the Turkish demonstrator who stood for six hours in a silent vigil, protesters are silently standing while reading books. The Al Jazeera photo-essay shows Nietzsche, Camus, and Orwell as popular picks.

millionsmillions:

The book club has turned into a form of protest. Inspired by “The Standing Man,” the Turkish demonstrator who stood for six hours in a silent vigil, protesters are silently standing while reading books. The Al Jazeera photo-essay shows Nietzsche, Camus, and Orwell as popular picks.

You have, which is a rare thing, that ability and the responsibility to listen to the dissent in yourself, to at least give it the floor, because it is the key — not only to consciousness, but to real growth. To accept duality is to earn identity. And identity is something that you are constantly earning. It is not just who you are. It is a process that you must be active in.

Joss Whedon

Commencement Speech, 2013, Wesleyan University

Our lives are not as limited as we think they are; the world is a wonderfully weird place; consensual reality is significantly flawed; no institution can be trusted, but love does work; all things are possible; and we all could be happy and fulfilled if we only had the guts to be truly free and the wisdom to shrink our egos and quit taking ourselves so damn seriously.

I do believe in simplicity. It is astonishing as well as sad, how many trivial affairs even the wisest thinks he must attend to in a day; how singular an affair he thinks he must omit. When the mathematician would solve a difficult problem, he first frees the equation of all incumbrances, and reduces it to its simplest terms. So simplify the problem of life, distinguish the necessary and the real. Probe the earth to see where your main roots run.

Henry David Thoreau (via aliceinnappyland)

(Source: goodreads.com, via agoodworkerdoes)